Catch flights, not communicable diseases

Catch flights, not communicable diseases

July 06, 2019

You saved for months. You spent hours planning, booking, and confirming your travel itinerary. You got time off work approved. It’s finally time for summer vacation. You land in your destination after a six hour flight and… you can’t poop for three days. 

Sound familiar? Airplane travel can wreak some serious havoc on the bod (especially those of us who are extra sensitive). Luckily, VeesHoney is here to help you enjoy every second of your well-deserved vacation.

Dehydration

A three hour flight can shed up to 1.5 liters of water from the body. Plus, with humidity levels as low as 4%, the plane’s artificially arid atmosphere can cause the mucous membranes of your nose, mouth and throat to dry out. Not only is this rough on your skin, it can also throw off your body’s internal functions. Not cute.

  • Bring a reusable water bottle (at least 32 ounces). I like the Hydroflask.
  • Stock up on electrolytes to boost hydration. Ultima and Lyteshow are two products I swear by.
  • Eat foods that are high in water content. I pack my own veggie produce (leave extras on the plane if you’re traveling internationally). Zucchini, jicama, celery, carrots and cucumber are my all-stars, just make sure to chew them really well and take a digestive enzyme before-hand.
  • Don’t drink caffeine or alcohol while on the flight. If you need an extra reason to avoid an in-flight cup, recent studies have shown the water in airplane tanks that’s used to brew your caffeinated drink may be contaminated with E. coli. That’s some serious tea! 

Circulation

According to some studies, airplane cabin pressure is 25% lower than normal atmospheric pressure. Reduced air pressure on flights can reduce the amount of oxygen in your blood between 6 and 25%, which is a pretty extreme side-effect.

  • Take chlorophyll drops to boost the oxygen in your blood while you’re in the air. I add one dropper full of ChlorOxygen drops to a 32 ounce water bottle before take-off and once I land. If you’re concerned about taste, I recommend the mint flavor—way more tolerable for the taste buds.
  • Compression leggings can help stimulate circulation and keep your limbs from swelling. My favorite pair is from Anna Zahn at Ricari Studios.

Bloating

Air pressure changes can cause a build-up of gas in your body, which leads to bloating and constipation. Also, because of decreased oxygen levels in your body, your blood vessels constrict and your digestive system slows down.

  • Empty your colon pre-flight. If you’re on the coffee enema train, I highly recommend doing one before you board.
  • Avoid bloat-causing foods. That means cruciferous vegetables (bye broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts), greasy airport take-out, refined carbs that act like glue in your intestines, and dairy products. Of course, every person is built differently, so pay attention to what triggers bloat in your body and cut it out of your diet at least 24 hours before you fly. 
  • Peppermint drops also help with bloating. Herb Pharm is a great brand. Add five drops to your water while flying (you can mix these with the chlorophyll drops without any problems). 
  • Betaine hydrochloride is a digestive enzyme that can help break down food while you’re in the air. A must-have for sure.
  • Pack ginger tea bags to relieve an upset stomach (skip the Ginger Ale, which is loaded with sugar and other toxic gunk). 

Contamination

The plane’s lack of moisture makes it a breeding ground for airborne infection, since viruses that cause cold and respiratory infection thrive in low humidity. 

  • Make Livion Labs Lypo-spheric Vitamin C your best friend. Take one packet with water before you fly. 
  • Wipe down your immediate surroundings. This includes your seat, the tray table, the AC/light controls and the window. Pick up some non-toxic sanitizing wipes (I recommend EO’s coconut lemon wipes) before your trip for an affordable cleaning solution with added aromatherapy benefits.  

Circadian Rhythm 

Sleep is one of the pillars of good health, but crossing time zones can throw your body for a loop. Some experts caution that it takes your body one day for every hour of timezone you cross for circadian rhythms and sleep to get back in sync. For example, if you take a flight from LA to NYC, you’ll need about three days to feel normal again. Of course, that’s not always realistic, and there are methods you can employ to jump-start your body’s recovery.

  • Liveli makes a natural sleep aid supplement that will help your system regain normal sleep patterns.
  • Pick up a pair of blue light blocking glasses. I like Swanwick, but there are other brands that provide the same effect without yellow tinting if that’s your preference.
  • Natural Calm makes a magnesium powder that can help you fall asleep (also available in convenient travel packs). It’s a must-have for red-eye flights and time zone changes. 

Radiation

Every time you fly, your body is exposed to low levels of cosmic radiation. The longer and higher you fly, the more radiation you receive. The airport security screening body-scanning units also release low levels of radiation, so a day of travel can result in higher-than-normal levels of exposure. 

  • EMFsol.com is my go-to source for radiation prevention. You can buy a protective chip and wear it under your clothes (put it in your bra, in the elastic band of your underwear or in your pocket) to help shield you from harmful rays. They also have necklaces you can purchase that have a similar effect. 

Routine

Last but not least, don’t let travel be an excuse to go completely off your supplement routine (especially those of you on the VeesHoney program). I always, always portion out supplements into reusable bags to make them super accessible and excuse-proof. Make sure they’re in your carry-on in case there are any luggage delays at the airport.




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